How to get into rigging

As any other creative endeavour, rigging tends to have a steep learning curve. There is just so much to learn. But fear not, the steeper the learning curve the higher the satisfaction of going along.

Previously, I have written about how I got to be a rigger, but I do want to go over the thoughts that made me persist with it. Because, persistence and deliberate practice is the only way to acquire and cultivate a passion.

So, a lot of people getting into rigging for the first time start with trying to rig a character. I understand that, usually there is a need for that, so it only makes sense. It is unrealistic though to expect that the rig will be any good. Which is of course fine, considering it is your first time rigging. But making something that sucks is quite discouraging. To make it easier for yourself to persist with it, I would suggest to predispose yourself to winning. How do you go about doing that?

Well, a common example is making your bed. If you do it first thing in the morning you have started your day with a small win. If you setup more tasks like that you create a chain of success, which tricks your brain on expecting and predisposing yourself more towards the same thing.

So, instead of a character rig, how about starting with the bouncing ball? If the animators start with it, why not us? I did not rig a bouncing ball though, so preaching rigging one does not sit right. What I started with was a super simple anglepoise lamp like this one.

Anglepoise lamp

It is quite similar to pixar’s luxo junior, so I thought it would be a good fun and it really was.

After that I moved on to rigging an actual character. It still sucked, but I definitely felt good about it, because even though I had rigged something before, it was still my first character rig. Additionally I remember how excited one of the two rigging workshops that I had at uni got me. There was this setup of train wheels.

Train wheels pistons rigging

The lecturer asked us how to go about rigging this, so we only control the rotation of the wheels and the pistons would follow properly. If you have some basic rigging knowledge, give it a go. Pistons are always a fun thing to rig.

The reason this got me excited was that it actually opened me up to the problem solving aspect of rigging. You are presented with htis situation and you have to find a way to make it work in a specific manner. That’s it. There might be many ways to go about it, but in the end the desired result is only one. This means you cannot bullshit your way out of it, because if it does not work, it is pretty clear that it does not.

So after you have got some simpler tasks under your belt and maybe you have started rigging your first character there will be a lot of roadblocks. And I do mean a lot. Sometimes you might think that your problem is unique and you will not be able to solve it but I assure you, everything you are going to run into in your first rigs most of us have gone through, so you can always look it up or ask. Honestly, we seem to be a friendly and helpful lot.

The way I overcame most of my roadblocks was to open a new file, build an incredibly simplified version of what I am trying to do and see if I can build it, however messy it gets. This helps isolate the problem and see clearly all sides of it.

At about this point where you have some rigging knowledge I would suggest opening the node editor and starting to get into the vastness of maya’s underlying structure. I do not mean the maya API, although that is certainly something you’d need to look into at a later point, but more to get familiar with the different nodes, how they work and potential applications of them. If you are anything like me you would want to build your own “under the hood”. It is a blessing and a curse really as sometimes I feel too strong of an urge to build something that is already there just so I can have it built myself. It’s crazy and very distracting, but also it gets you asking questions and poking around which proves to be quite useful.

So seeing the actual connections of everything you do is really nice in terms of feeling that you understand what you are doing. For example, if you graph the network of a parent constraint you would see where the connections come from and where they go, which will give you some idea of what happens under the hood. Same goes for everything really – skinClusters, other deformers, math nodes, shading nodes, etc. What this is supposed to do is to make you feel like you have a lot to work with, because you really do. With the available math nodes, you can build most of the algorithms you would need. That being said, the lack of trigonometry nodes is a bit annoying, but you can always write your own nodes when you need them.

The last tip I can think of for keeping your interest in rigging would be to start scripting stuff and not use MEL to do it. There is nothing wrong with using MEL if you really want to, or to support legacy code, but considering that 99% of what is done with MEL can be done with Python and the other 1% is stuff you definitely do not need I consider using MEL a terrible idea for your future. Python is a very versatile programming language and also (personal preference) it is simple, very pretty and quick to prototype with. Honestly, I think The zen of python is awesome to live by.

Honestly, I think everyone should learn to code, not only because in the near future it will expose a lot of possibilities to make nice changes in your day to day life, but also because of the way coding makes you think about stuff. Some of the main benefits I find are:
– The process of writing a script to do something makes you understand how it is done
– The time saved is invaluable
– The satisfaction of seeing your code work is incredible

Then what I would do after having some rigging knowledge, some maya infrastructure knowledge and some scripting knowledge is build a face rig, and take my time with it. If you create a nice face rig, it will be loads of fun to play around with it, which is very satisfying. And I am sure, at that point you will be hooked.

That’s it. I covered most of the things that have kept me interesting in rigging while I was struggling with it. I am sure that if you have picked up rigging enough to read this post, you already are a curious individual so sticking to it will not be hard.

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